5% was admittedly an exaggeration, just felt that low. I'd say it was probably closer to the 30-40% range. It was Artifacts of the Blacksilt, spent a good 10-15 minutes killing Blacksilt Seers to get two damn idols to drop. A quest that had me killing Elder Brown Bears for bear flanks also took quite a while, though that was less due to drop rate and more due to how spread out they were.
Galakrond-Alliance-USGalakrond-H-USGarithos-Alliance-USGarithos-Horde-USGarona-Alliance-USGarona-Horde-USGarrosh-Alliance-USGarrosh-Horde-USGhostlands-Alliance-USGhostlands-Horde-USGilneas-Alliance-USGilneas-Horde-USGnomeregan-Alliance-USGnomeregan-Horde-USGorefiend-Alliance-USGorefiend-Horde-USGorgonnash-Alliance-USGorgonnash-Horde-USGreymane-Alliance-USGreymane-Horde-USGrizzly Hills-Alliance-USGrizzly Hills-Horde-USGul'dan-Alliance-USGul'dan-Horde-USGundrak-Alliance-USGundrak-Horde-USGurubashi-Alliance-USGurubashi-Horde-USGallywix-Alliance-USGallywix-Horde-USGoldrinn-Alliance-USGoldrinn-Horde-US

Playing through these zones, each with their own unique but interconnected stories and refreshing designs, immediately brought me back to how I felt when I played vanilla World of Warcraft and some of its earliest expansions. Instead of being a hero with near god-like powers like in recent years, players are back to being more grounded adventurers (going on more grounded, but still enticing adventures).
S Sanguino Alliance Sanguino Horde Sargeras Alliance Sargeras Horde Saurfang Alliance Saurfang Horde Scarshield Legion Alliance Scarshield Legion Horde Sen'jin Alliance Sen'jin Horde Shadowsong Alliance Shadowsong Horde Shattered Halls Alliance Shattered Halls Horde Shattered Hand Alliance Shattered Hand Horde Shattrath Alliance Shattrath Horde Shen'dralar Alliance Shen'dralar Horde Silvermoon Alliance Silvermoon Horde Sinstralis Alliance Sinstralis Horde Skullcrusher Alliance Skullcrusher Horde Spinebreaker Alliance Spinebreaker Horde Sporeggar Alliance Sporeggar Horde Steamwheedle Cartel Alliance Steamwheedle Cartel Horde Stormrage Alliance Stormrage Horde Stormreaver Alliance Stormreaver Horde Stormscale Alliance Stormscale Horde Sunstrider Alliance Sunstrider Horde Suramar Alliance Suramar Horde Sylvanas Alliance Sylvanas Horde
First up we have patch 7.3.5, which was implemented several months ago as a major shakeup to how leveling was approached. Instead of going from low to high level zones like the way the game had always operated, Blizzard opened up the map with more of a Guild Wars 2 type system -- you now have more of a choice of where to go with a scaling mechanic. But when combined with 8.0's massive stat overhaul, things got murky. 

Then 8.0 came along and turned everything on its head. Most of the techniques and shortcuts discovered, after 7.3.5 introduced scaling, were nerfed into oblivion. Many of the old techniques were confirmed by myself, first hand, to no longer work. I'm hoping that this thread can serve a similar purpose as the old thread, and gather as much data as possible on the fastest methods under the new system, and facilitate as many different perspectives and opinions on speed leveling with constructive discussion.


Was doing it at 52 on my lightforged paladin and it was easily the slowest zone out of the ones I'd done. Granted, I didn't have War Mode on so I didn't have any PVP talents, but it felt like about 40% of my time was spent waiting around for respawns or wandering around looking for mobs to kill to get a quest item that had like a 5% drop rate. Maybe I just got unlucky but I definitely won't be going to that zone again for future heritage armor runs.
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The WoW token is very simple: You pay Blizzard $20 for a token, and then you can sell the token on the in-game auction house. A player with gold can buy a token and redeem it for a month of WoW subscription time or for $15 of Battle.net balance, which is like a gift card credit that can be redeemed in WoW or other Blizzard games such as Hearthstone and Overwatch. You get their gold; they get your cash, or at least most of it.
Again it breaks down to personal preference. I didn’t have an issue doing them at 120 on the toons I did them on. I felt like they took you out of the way when I just wanted to finish the zones. Too each his own. I liked it because I would finish the quest then be right there at the hubs for the quest on the new continent after I’ve finished all the quest on the first continent.
If the new Battle.net balance has given rich players a new incentive to liquidate, and the spiking prices are a result of them trying to sell all their gold at once? Prices for tokens could settle much lower once that stash of gold has been depleted. This seems likely, because there’s a compelling new reason to sell gold, but no new reason to buy it. Blizzard has a good way to drain those gold reserves from the market.
How many hours will players grind for a token now worth $15? On the Chinese and European servers — which include Eastern European countries where minimum wages are less than the equivalent of $2 per hour — there are plenty of people willing to sell their time for these prices. There is more of a question of relative value in North America, where players tend to value their time more highly relative to subscription costs.

Further, players with large stashes of gold are currently converting all their in-game wealth into Battle.net balance right now, which is likely pushing prices up. Some of these players have lots of gold income from expansive auction-house rackets, and these players may keep buying tokens … but many of them are just liquidating the stashes they earned from their Draenor garrisons.
The community was apparently frustrated with Blizzard for a lack of communication concerning the issue, but it looks like that was due to the fact that their heads were down as they worked to understand the problem. It was explained that they didn't want to just roll out a quick bandage, as that would likely cause unforeseen issues down the road. Instead, they're crunching the numbers and digging into the code in the hopes of discovering a legitimate source of the problem.
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