The trend then reversed, and the price fell all the way back to 60,000 gold on Wednesday before recovering to around 80,000 Wednesday night. Over the weekend, prices have been fluctuating between 80,000 and 100,000 gold. When prices climb too high, people start paying cash to buy tokens and get gold, but the people with the gold stop buying tokens.
But when it comes time to level another character for any reason, this pace is going to make me think twice. And that's a shame. I'm not someone who gets any particular joy out of instant-boosting a character to max level. There are dozens of zones -- no exaggeration -- that I wouldn't mind experiencing again, if I could do a few of them at a time and feel like I was making meaningful progress on another level-110 in the process.
The community was apparently frustrated with Blizzard for a lack of communication concerning the issue, but it looks like that was due to the fact that their heads were down as they worked to understand the problem. It was explained that they didn't want to just roll out a quick bandage, as that would likely cause unforeseen issues down the road. Instead, they're crunching the numbers and digging into the code in the hopes of discovering a legitimate source of the problem.
First up we have patch 7.3.5, which was implemented several months ago as a major shakeup to how leveling was approached. Instead of going from low to high level zones like the way the game had always operated, Blizzard opened up the map with more of a Guild Wars 2 type system -- you now have more of a choice of where to go with a scaling mechanic. But when combined with 8.0's massive stat overhaul, things got murky.
In 2015, Blizzard started letting players buy gold from each other using WoW Tokens, to try to control the process and mitigate damage. “Time is money, friend — but sometimes one is harder to come by than the other,” Blizzard says on the official page. “Now World of Warcraft players can use the WoW Token in exchange for game time or Battle.net Balance!”
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