Certain locations in World of Warcraft – primarily inns, capital cities, and private instanced zones like your garrison or class order hall – are rest areas. You know you’ve entered one because your character portrait will gain a “Zzz” icon where your level is normally shown, and because you can immediately log out of the game instead of waiting 20 seconds.
Step-by-step class guides are on the way!  The 1-12 Mulgore Guide is the first guide to get all the individual class steps.  At the top of the guide, simply select which class you are playing and the page will dynamically update all the steps in the guide for that class (both text and images).  The rest of the guides will be slowly updated overtime to include all the class steps, but you can see how it's going to work with the 1-12 Mulgore.  I want to thank crazyK and his Placeholderguild for helping me out with the individual class content.  They are allowing me to get the 1-60 Alliance guide done while also getting all the class steps done at the same time, so everything can be ready for Classic launch (hopefully).
The recruit also grants the recruiter levels, with the latter gaining one level for every two levels the recruit gains. There are a lot of rules and restrictions to that, however. It all basically boils down to leveling alternate characters together. The recruiter can even earn epic mounts and battle pets if you stick with the game for a couple months.
There are various upsides to this imbalance. Max level players are able to complete lower level content with ease, allowing them to swiftly complete missed quests and achievements in earlier zones, and can travel through zones without being constantly attacked, since mobs will only attack players several levels higher than them if walked directly into. Max level also makes it possible to solo earlier group content such as dungeons and even raids, making farming loot such as mounts far easier, and for those interested in a challenge opening up a new subtype of play at slightly higher levels.
In August 2016, when Legion was released, a WoW token was worth 35,000 gold. Prices began to rise after Blizzard announced that tokens would be redeemable for Battle.net balance, and when the new functionality was released, the price of a token surged to about 90,000 gold. In July 2018, shortly before the release of Battle for Azeroth, prices peaked above 200,000 gold per token.
Fourth, beginning in Mists of Pandaria with the Halfhill farm, and continuing in Warlords of Draenor with various garrison buildings that produced resources, Blizzard has been making trade goods more plentiful and easier to obtain. In Legion, herbs, fish and enchanting materials were so abundant that a very small population of gatherers could supply more raw materials than the economy could consume.
The guide works great (of course expect a) BUT, after reaching 120 there should also be a guide to open and explore the remaining areas. Also, sometimes when multiple objectives are required, the guide forces you to follow in the order the guide prefers and if you don’t the objective is not rewarded. Gotta start catching up on the followers guides also. All in all, the $47 a year in-game guide is well worth it.
There are also numerous gold-making guides available for World of Warcraft players. Currently mmobux recommends Killer Guides' World of Warcraft Gold Guide, which covers a broad range from daily quests and professions to making gold while leveling and auction house trading. 'Standard' farming spots are covered as well, making it an interesting resource for bots as well. Yielding up to 500 gold per hour, the strategies are suitable for players of all skill levels. If Killer Guides keeps the guide up to date, it probably will become a valuable resource for professional farmers as well. There also seems to be a German-language version available: WoW Gold Guide (German)
After about two weeks, the extreme volatility of the first few days has subsided. Prices fluctuated between 87,000 and 91,000 gold over the Feb 18-20 weekend, but intraday price variance continues to be high relative to historical standards, and it's still unclear whether these prices are sustainable in the long term, or whether they reflect the temporary impact of a handful of players dumping lots of gold.

The level cap represents the ultimate goal and culmination of the leveling process, with max-level characters having gained access to all class abilities and talents, and being able to access end-game content and equip the most powerful gear. By providing an equal limit for the progression of all characters, the level cap allows for competitive and balanced gameplay in both PvE and PvP.
Even though the guide was developed with a hunter, the guide can be followed by any class.  Except you have to do your class's quests which aren't a whole lot.  I do have full intention to make my guide friendly with all classes in the future by listing all of their steps as well.  There will be a toggle that allows you to show which class's steps you want to see in the guide.  But this is coming later.
Fifth: As for Azerite Armor, I recommend getting the Chest first from Magini and if you do Vol'dun first, the first piece you can get will be a Head and the final piece from the zone with be Shoulders. That will give you all 3 pieces of Azerite Armor when you leave the first zone which will help out. If you are leveling a different spec from what you plan on playing, (i.e leveling as a dps when you plan to heal/tank) you will receive at least 2 pieces from every zone then 1 piece from starting the War Campaign that you can choose your Main Spec trait for. Pick the traits that will help you level the fastest.
Like most of those experienced players, I had all the benefits, including a full set of heirloom armor, which helps to boost the experience my character would get (though that bump was reduced at the same time the other changes were made.) I had a guild, the ability to fly in every zone, and pets and toys that made a pile of things more convenient. My new character started at level 20, as all allied races do.
The community was apparently frustrated with Blizzard for a lack of communication concerning the issue, but it looks like that was due to the fact that their heads were down as they worked to understand the problem. It was explained that they didn't want to just roll out a quick bandage, as that would likely cause unforeseen issues down the road. Instead, they're crunching the numbers and digging into the code in the hopes of discovering a legitimate source of the problem.
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