Finally: Gearing happens in a pretty linear way for BFA. Once you hit 120, normal dungeons drop 310 and you need 305 item level to start heroics. Heroics drop 325 and I recommend doing Mythic at around 320. Mythic drops 340 and I highly recommend clearing every single mythic dungeon to give you the highest item level going into week 2. On launch, you will have access to 9 Mythic dungeons and there will be 1 dungeon that is gated behind honor bound rep; Siege of Boralus is gated for the Horde and King’s Rest is gated for the Alliance. I am not 100% sure on this, but I do not believe you will be able to obtain enough Honorbound rep to unlock those dungeons with the first week. Either way, its important to get a clear of all 9 dungeons first week to give you the most chances at loot. If PvP is more your thing gear starts at 280 and I am not 100 percent sure how PvP gear works for BFA. I will do more research and fill this in the best I can.
Playing through these zones, each with their own unique but interconnected stories and refreshing designs, immediately brought me back to how I felt when I played vanilla World of Warcraft and some of its earliest expansions. Instead of being a hero with near god-like powers like in recent years, players are back to being more grounded adventurers (going on more grounded, but still enticing adventures).
For future reference, it is a great option to purchase mounts and pets as a long-term investment. Not only do their prices scale well even when a new expansion drops, but there is always a demand for them. The only drawback to this strategy is you would need a hefty amount of initial wow gold investment and also maybe have to go through the motions of spending for a guild bank.
As you're leveling, I generally recommend you just follow the natural flow of the progression through each zone. They're laid out fairly reasonably. But don't be afraid to hop around, especially if you're near a quest objective. You shouldn't actually need ALL of the zones listed to reach 62. Pick the ones you like best. It's much more important to simply be as focused as possible and flow from one quest to the next.
Tiragarde Sound and Stormsong Valley are both fairly similar zones, but Stormsong is a little longer, meaning that you might not even have to finish it to hit 120. Tiragarde also comes with a bit of a warning. There are plenty of side quests to do in the zone after you finish the story quests. Don’t do them. It’s not worth the time or the experience you’ll get.

Une autre manière d'améliorer grandement votre expérience gagnée par heure de jeu sera de faire l'acquisition de la monture Trotteur aquatique azur auprès de Nat Pagle, en Pandarie, grâce à la faction Les Hameçonneurs. Une fois Exalté auprès de ces derniers, vous pourrez acheter cette monture contre 1250 Po, qui vous permettra alors de vous déplacer aisément sur l'eau, vous faisant gagner ainsi de précieuses secondes. Si vous n'êtes pas encore exalté auprès d'eux, mettez-vous y le plus tôt possible : 15 jours de 3 quêtes journalières avec des bonus de gain de réputation devraient être suffisant !


For Alliance it's Lok'Modan, Redridge, Darkshore, Felwood, Stranglethorn (both parts), Plaguelands. Somewhere between 3 - 3.5 of these get you to 60 in like a 16 hours /played, if you queue for dungeons at the same time. I recommend dropping everything at 45 and going to Darkshore-Felwood if you didn't do them yet - they are literally the fastest levelling zones in the game right now, maybe only trumped by Silverpine.
A token was selling for 58,000 gold early that morning. The price had been hovering between 55,000 and 60,000 gold for a couple of months. By Tuesday morning, the price had rocketed to 115,000 gold. Gold-makers were panicking; the value of WoW gold relative to real money was in free fall. Players predicted tokens climbing to auction house prices as high as 200,000 gold.
Ever since Blizzard introduced the WoW Token, World of Warcraft's in-game gold has had a more direct comparison to real-world markets. WoW tokens can be bought with real money ($20) and then sold on the World of Warcraft auction house for gold. Players who buy a WoW token with gold get to redeem it for $15 on their Blizzard account, which is equal to one month of WoW playtime.
It's not an enchantment, but you should buy or craft an iLVL 100+ belt, gloves, or boots with a gem socket for use with the new 5% bonus experience gem: Insightful Rubellite. I used a vendor-bought belt from the legacy valor vendor in Orgrimmar, since it was convenient and met the minimum ilvl bonus. Keep these in your bags until you can equip them, which should be just in time for treasure collections in WoD content. I didn't ever replace the belt until I dinged 110, since I didn't feel the stats from later upgraded belt drops made enough of a difference to outweigh the 5% bonus. This is explained below, in the WoD treasure section.
I made one for my guildies but its for the Horde leveling process. One tip that goes for both factions is that you dont need to do all 3 zones to hit 120. I did like 1 and than three quarters of another. But once your 120 you need friendly with all 3 of your factions new reps to unlock world quests so make sure you hit at least friendly with all 3 while your leveling.
The WoW token is very simple: You pay Blizzard $20 for a token, and then you can sell the token on the in-game auction house. A player with gold can buy a token and redeem it for a month of WoW subscription time or for $15 of Battle.net balance, which is like a gift card credit that can be redeemed in WoW or other Blizzard games such as Hearthstone and Overwatch. You get their gold; they get your cash, or at least most of it.
×