The reason for this is simple: Most players don’t need a lot of gold or care very much about it. An active player might earn an income of a few thousand gold per week from sending followers on missions and doing World Quests that award gold. They might then spend most of that money at the auction house buying things like flasks and stat-buffing food to do raids and Mythic+ dungeons. Gold just isn’t a big deal for them.
For future reference, it is a great option to purchase mounts and pets as a long-term investment. Not only do their prices scale well even when a new expansion drops, but there is always a demand for them. The only drawback to this strategy is you would need a hefty amount of initial wow gold investment and also maybe have to go through the motions of spending for a guild bank.
It is reported that Battle for Azeroth is regarded as the best expansion for both developers and players in World of Warcraft last decade. Different from Legion, it brings the conflict back to Warcraft's core: the Horde versus the Alliance in all-out war. So far over 3.4 million units worldwide are enjoy BFA which is alse listed the fastest-selling expansion.

Selling gold for cash was, for a long time, against the game’s rules. But that didn’t stop large, sophisticated operations from springing up to take advantage of the opportunity to make real-world cash. The outfits that sold gold to players started out by paying foreign workers very low wages to endlessly grind the game, but they later started procuring their gold through quicker and more disruptive methods.

Elixirs serve the same purpose as Flasks, but the buff expires if you die. You'll only use these between 1-70, generally speaking, until you can start buying Flasks which persist through death. Try not to die, and carry extras just in case. If you can't find an Elixir with the stat you want, look under scrolls, since they count as battle or guardian buffs as well.
From my experience on the Beta as an enchanter/tailor, scrap every trinket (and maybe rings). Trinkets seem to always give expulsom and it's needed in the higher enchants. Scrap any cloth green drops for the extra cloth, but other gear and blues and purples disenchant for the mats. The scrapper seems bad at the return on some items. I'd scrap old Azerite armor and get some cloth and a bit of thread.
For future reference, it is a great option to purchase mounts and pets as a long-term investment. Not only do their prices scale well even when a new expansion drops, but there is always a demand for them. The only drawback to this strategy is you would need a hefty amount of initial wow gold investment and also maybe have to go through the motions of spending for a guild bank.
Tiragarde Sound and Stormsong Valley are both fairly similar zones, but Stormsong is a little longer, meaning that you might not even have to finish it to hit 120. Tiragarde also comes with a bit of a warning. There are plenty of side quests to do in the zone after you finish the story quests. Don’t do them. It’s not worth the time or the experience you’ll get.
This level range opens a variety of zones from the Cataclysm expansion, which are spread across the game’s original continents, but it’s more efficient to head to the continent of Pandaria. You can spend the entirety of this level range exploring its uniquely themed zones and quests. The Jade Forest, Valley of the Four Winds, and Kun-Lai Summit are our picks, but all the zones are worth checking out.

The most recent run I did on my hunter, I never set foot in Ghostlands, nor did I need to fully complete Dustwallow Marsh. There are a LOT of quest lines in each of these zones that might not be available unless you progress and complete story-line quests in order. Northern Barrens and Andorhal are especially bad in this regard, but many zones you can easily miss out on a lot of quests if you don't do a vital quest. So make sure you keep an eye on the minimap for quest ! indicators.
In recent weeks, players have been giving Blizzard an earful concerning experience gains and leveling in World of Warcraft. It looks like a couple of issues are at the heart of these problems, including time to kill certain baddies and the time it takes to level up between levels 60 and 80. While Blizzard is still trying to figure out why some baddies are taking too long to kill, the hope is that a hotfix launched this week will address the problem of leveling.

Even though the guide was developed with a hunter, the guide can be followed by any class.  Except you have to do your class's quests which aren't a whole lot.  I do have full intention to make my guide friendly with all classes in the future by listing all of their steps as well.  There will be a toggle that allows you to show which class's steps you want to see in the guide.  But this is coming later.
As you continue to push through end-game content and you raise your reputations with various groups, you unlock more quests that send you to the opposing faction's continent where you generally try to mess with them, gather intel on their movements, and, of course, kill a whole bunch of them. These quest lines are fun, but generally pretty short and don't actually propel you through much of the three opposing zones.
Quests from the Tortollans, a race of turtle people, can be mind-numbingly dumb and slow. One of the standards that you'll see is one of those matching games arranged in a grid where you can only turn over two items at once to see if they match. Another, and the worst of all the quests I've done in 13 years with World of Warcraft, is a turtle "maze" where you slowly guide a slow-ass turtle through a slow-ass grid for seemingly no reason other than to get a reward at the end.
As you continue to push through end-game content and you raise your reputations with various groups, you unlock more quests that send you to the opposing faction's continent where you generally try to mess with them, gather intel on their movements, and, of course, kill a whole bunch of them. These quest lines are fun, but generally pretty short and don't actually propel you through much of the three opposing zones.
Prior to update 7.3.5 it was far too easy to level up a new character. The experience needed to advance from one level to the next was too low, resulting in players out-leveling the story quests in each zone, moving on before getting the full experience. With low monster health and high player power (especially when players were outfitted in ridiculously powerful heirloom gear), creatures dropped like flies. Combined with easy experience gained by joining parties in the dungeon finder, the first 60 levels in the game flew by.
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Special note: At 110 it's almost certainly worthwhile to go and immediately get your Heart of Azeroth and first piece of Azerite gear from the BfA opening quest. It doesn't take long and provides pretty high power levels. I'd then return to Legion quests until 111 or even 112, since the power of these items will increase your kill speed significantly over the scaled enemies of BfA content.
Edit 20 It’s been a week since this post and a lot of people are still reaching out to me with questions which is fine. I have had a few different people reach out to me to help make YouTube videos based off this guide and more info in BFA which I’m more than willing to do. Whoever gets the videos up first I will link them here for you guys to enjoy. 
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