If the new Battle.net balance has given rich players a new incentive to liquidate, and the spiking prices are a result of them trying to sell all their gold at once? Prices for tokens could settle much lower once that stash of gold has been depleted. This seems likely, because there’s a compelling new reason to sell gold, but no new reason to buy it. Blizzard has a good way to drain those gold reserves from the market.

Most classes in World of Warcraft start at first level, but Death Knights and Demon Hunters are exceptions. They start at level 55 and 98, respectively. This alone can shave a huge chunk of time from your leveling experience. Of course, it only works if you want to play a Death Knight or Demon Hunter, but they’re both solid classics that can dish out damage or tank in a group.
By constantly doing quests, you will experience a very different game than if you just level through pure grinding. You'll be out there making a contribution towards the Alliance or the Horde. Doing these quests takes you through the heart of the game's story AND provides the fastest rate of experience. Have fun in World of Warcraft and enjoy developing your hero - your adventures will gain you great reputation amongst the land.
Gold in WoW has value based on the time it takes a player to earn it. The various methods of farming gold, such as growing herbs, yield maybe 20,000 gold per hour. That means at a price of 100,000 gold, a token represents about five hours of grinding, or offers a wage of $3 per hour. The idea of gold being worth a certain amount per hour is a useful way of framing this discussion, in fact.
Also note that power leveling is sometimes used to refer to paying someone else to level your character to cap as fast as possible (i.e. they power level for you); a distinction used by Blizzard is to refer to the paid leveling as "power leveling service." This behavior is against Blizzard's Terms of Service. Power leveling yourself, which this article covers, is perfectly acceptable.

In August 2016, when Legion was released, a WoW token was worth 35,000 gold. Prices began to rise after Blizzard announced that tokens would be redeemable for Battle.net balance, and when the new functionality was released, the price of a token surged to about 90,000 gold. In July 2018, shortly before the release of Battle for Azeroth, prices peaked above 200,000 gold per token.
In 2015, Blizzard started letting players buy gold from each other using WoW Tokens, to try to control the process and mitigate damage. “Time is money, friend — but sometimes one is harder to come by than the other,” Blizzard says on the official page. “Now World of Warcraft players can use the WoW Token in exchange for game time or Battle.net Balance!”
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