Again it breaks down to personal preference. I didn’t have an issue doing them at 120 on the toons I did them on. I felt like they took you out of the way when I just wanted to finish the zones. Too each his own. I liked it because I would finish the quest then be right there at the hubs for the quest on the new continent after I’ve finished all the quest on the first continent.
Also note that power leveling is sometimes used to refer to paying someone else to level your character to cap as fast as possible (i.e. they power level for you); a distinction used by Blizzard is to refer to the paid leveling as "power leveling service." This behavior is against Blizzard's Terms of Service. Power leveling yourself, which this article covers, is perfectly acceptable.
So, the initial leveling process is probably the longest it has been in an expansion in a long time. My first play through, it took me about 12 hours to finish every single quest in every single zone. Needless to say, due to leveling 7 times, my last leveling was done by a ret pally and took me just over 8 hours and completed every quest in the Horde zones. There are a few tips I would like to give for leveling in BFA.
I'm very, very interested in a guide that takes into the following: 1) Dungeon finder; and 2) Heirloom items. I've never helped with a guide before, but would be open to help in collaborating on the project. With the leveling guides I've used (primarily this one) I, too, find that I level at a rate that throws the pace of the guide way off (not its fault at all, I can't say enough good stuff about the guide) to the point that I get frustrated and just queue up for dungeons.

Cooking benefits all classes, especially melee and hunters (it is a free source of food). Until higher levels, the benefits it provides are almost exclusively stamina buffs. While more stamina is always nice, cooking is not essential to leveling. Considering the time investment required, if you pick up skinning then cooking would absolutely be a wise skill to level prior to hitting your level cap, as beasts often drop meat useful for skilling up.


Baelgun - Alliance Baelgun - Horde Balnazzar - Alliance Balnazzar - Horde Blackhand - Alliance Blackhand - Horde Blackmoore - Alliance Blackmoore - Horde Blackrock - Alliance Blackrock - Horde Blackscar - Alliance Blackscar - Horde Bloodfeather - Alliance Bloodfeather - Horde Bloodhoof - Alliance Bloodhoof - Horde Bloodscalp - Alliance Bloodscalp - Horde Blutkessel - Alliance Blutkessel - Horde Boulderfist - Alliance Boulderfist - Horde Bronze Dragonflight - Al... Bronze Dragonflight - Horde Bronzebeard - Alliance Bronzebeard - Horde Burning Blade - Alliance Burning Blade - Horde Burning Legion - Alliance Burning Legion - Horde Burning Steppes - Alliance Burning Steppes - Horde Bladefist - Alliance Bladefist - Horde Blade's Edge - Alliance Blade's Edge - Horde Booty Bay - Alliance Booty Bay - Horde Borean Tundra - Alliance Borean Tundra - Horde
The WoW token is very simple: You pay Blizzard $20 for a token, and then you can sell the token on the in-game auction house. A player with gold can buy a token and redeem it for a month of WoW subscription time or for $15 of Battle.net balance, which is like a gift card credit that can be redeemed in WoW or other Blizzard games such as Hearthstone and Overwatch. You get their gold; they get your cash, or at least most of it.

If you already have a high level character or a friend willing to give you gold then you can purchase Heirloom items. These items are bound to account and are accessible through the Heirlooms tab using Shift+P. The benefits of these Heirloom items is that they scale with your level keeping your gear up to date without you having to worry about upgrades, and they provide a significant XP bonus.
The WoW Token was created to give players with lots of extra gold the option to use it to help cover their subscription cost, and give those who want to purchase gold a way to do so from fellow players through a secure, easy-to-use system. The Token will be making its debut in an upcoming patch—in the meantime, check out the FAQ below for details on how it works.
“The biggest struggle of overhauls like item scaling is being able to exhaustively test it,” he said. “You can’t expect any group of a few hundred people to go in and hit every piece of content that’s ever been developed over the past 15 years of World of Warcraft. That is difficult and challenging to do. What we did was listen to a lot of feedback from the PTR, what those changes looked like there. “The community is a great resource for helping us understand what we missed, and we were able to develop technology to be agile about fixing the problems very quickly in a live environment when we did come across them. We did have a few hiccups when we launched the patch in terms of scaling issues, but a lot of those were addressed rather quickly and that’s due to the technology we’ve developed to hot-fix our servers and almost anything in the game without down-time.”
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Heirloom experience should be boosted, now that zones scale. If a zone scales along with me, it shouldn't matter if it gives me 20 levels instead of 10. I'm still enjoying the experience, even as a veteran player. I don't need to see every zone on every character again; that's the point of heirlooms. I can still enjoy the leveling experience, and the scaling, and the full outdoor experience of the zones -- and still get to the end game content I enjoy in a somewhat reasonable time as an employed adult. And the change wouldn't affect new players.
Also note that power leveling is sometimes used to refer to paying someone else to level your character to cap as fast as possible (i.e. they power level for you); a distinction used by Blizzard is to refer to the paid leveling as "power leveling service." This behavior is against Blizzard's Terms of Service. Power leveling yourself, which this article covers, is perfectly acceptable.
For Alliance it's Lok'Modan, Redridge, Darkshore, Felwood, Stranglethorn (both parts), Plaguelands. Somewhere between 3 - 3.5 of these get you to 60 in like a 16 hours /played, if you queue for dungeons at the same time. I recommend dropping everything at 45 and going to Darkshore-Felwood if you didn't do them yet - they are literally the fastest levelling zones in the game right now, maybe only trumped by Silverpine.

So, the initial leveling process is probably the longest it has been in an expansion in a long time. My first play through, it took me about 12 hours to finish every single quest in every single zone. Needless to say, due to leveling 7 times, my last leveling was done by a ret pally and took me just over 8 hours and completed every quest in the Horde zones. There are a few tips I would like to give for leveling in BFA.
Earthen Ring - Alliance Earthen Ring - Horde Echsenkessel - Alliance Echsenkessel - Horde Eitrigg - Alliance Eitrigg - Horde Eldre'Thalas - Alliance Eldre'Thalas - Horde Elune - Alliance Elune - Horde Emerald Dream - Alliance Emerald Dream - Horde Emeriss - Alliance Emeriss - Horde Eonar - Alliance Eonar - Horde Eredar - Alliance Eredar - Horde Executus - Alliance Executus - Horde Exodar - Alliance Exodar - Horde Eversong - Alliance Eversong - Horde
The WoW token is very simple: You pay Blizzard $20 for a token, and then you can sell the token on the in-game auction house. A player with gold can buy a token and redeem it for a month of WoW subscription time or for $15 of Battle.net balance, which is like a gift card credit that can be redeemed in WoW or other Blizzard games such as Hearthstone and Overwatch. You get their gold; they get your cash, or at least most of it. 
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